James Denselow

JDJames Denselow is a writer on Middle East politics and security issues. He completed his Masters at Kings College London (KCL) on International Boundary Studies and Middle Eastern Geopolitics and his currently finishing a PhD at KCL into Iraqi-Syrian state building. He has worked extensively in the Middle East, including research for foreign policy think tank Chatham House, writing and reporting for several media publications and for communications and advocacy work with international NGOs. He writes for The Guardian, The Huffington Post and the New Statesman and appears regularly on all forms of international media. He is a contributing author to “An Iraq of Its Regions: Cornerstones of a Federal Democracy?” and “America and Iraq: Policy-making, Intervention and Regional Politics Since 1958”. He is a board member of the Council for Arab-British Understanding (CAABU) and a Director of the ‘New Diplomacy Platform’ (NDP). His website is www.jamesdenselow.com
 

PUBLISHED WORK

 Terminal Decline: Palestinian Refugee Health in Lebanon (MAP Briefing Paper, November, 2011)

Iraq’s Borders: Post-War Dynamics in Historical Context (CAABU Briefing Paper No. 85, 2005)

•’Mosul, the Jazira Region and the Syrian-Iraqi Boundary’ in An Iraq of its Regions (Hurst, 2007)

•‘US-Iraq Security Dynamics’ in The United States and Iraq: Reflections and Projections(Routledge, 2008)

• Syrian-Iraqi Relations Post-9/11 (Forthcoming, I B Tauris, 2011)

 

MEDIA EXPERIENCE

Radio – BBC Today Programme, BBC Radio Wales, RTE Ireland, NPR, BBC Five Live, BBC World This Weekend,  Voice of America

Television – BBC News 24, BBC Newsnight, Sky News, Channel 4  News, Channel 5 News, Al Jazeera English, CNN, CNBC, ITN News, Bloomberg News. Press TV and Russia Today

 •Print – OpEds and articles for the Guardian, the Sunday Telegraph, the Yorkshire Post, the Huffington Post, New Statesman, Middle East International, The World Today, International Affairs and CTC-Sentinel  

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